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News about the brews
Blog / News about the brews

Over the past few months we’ve welcomed two new roasters and brew technicians to our Christchurch based team. They’ve survived a winter in our warehouse (the ultimate test) and so we’re delighted to introduce them and their favourite blends and brews to you.

hamishHamish Borgfeldt

Best name ever right? Sounds serious and Hamish is super serious about his coffee. Recently arrived back from Melbourne Hamish is a skilled barista, and has both technical knowledge about the mysterious tools of coffee making and a highly developed palate. At our daily cupping sessions Hamish is the first to detect hints of this and notes of that in each of the coffees we roast. Hamish has a young family to keep him busy outside of work and he’s enjoying getting to know his old hometown once again.

 

 

sam2Sam Miller

Sam is a coffee genius having travelled the world in search of the best green beans, been a medallist at national cupping competitions and is also an award winning brewer of craft beer. Sam has heaps of experience roasting coffee in Christchurch and we feel pretty honoured to have his talents as a Master Roaster. Sam is also pretty good at spinning tunes so he’s up at this year’s staff party.

 

 

 

What’s cupping?

cupping2

 

Here’s what wiki says: coffee cupping, or coffee tasting, is the practice of observing the tastes and aromas of brewed coffee. It is a professional practice but can be done informally by anyone or by professionals known as "Q Graders". A standard coffee cupping procedure involves deeply sniffing the coffee, then loudly slurping the coffee so it spreads to the back of the tongue. The coffee taster attempts to measure aspects of the coffee's taste, specifically the body (the texture or mouthfeel, such as oiliness), sweetnessacidity (a sharp and tangy feeling, like when biting into an orange), flavour (the characters in the cup), and aftertaste. Since coffee beans embody telltale flavours from the region where they were grown, cuppers may attempt to identify the coffee's origin.

 

We asked Sam and Hamish to share their favourite ‘recipes’ or brew methods for coffee at home and here’s two styles you might like to try at home. If you need any of this equipment head to our online shop or ask at your local Coffee Culture.

 

Blooming Good Coffee at Home

 

As much as we love espresso, filter coffee is our go to throughout the day in the Roastery. Modern filter coffees are simple to prepare and really capture the unique flavour notes of the roasted beans. 

  

Hario V60


hario2The V60 was first produced in 2004 by the Japanese company Hario. Named the V60 because of the V shaped design and 60 degree angles of the cone this genius device is ideal for making 1-2 cups at home.

What you'll need:

14g fresh filter grind coffee (should feel like caster sugar)
250ml boiling hot filtered water.
Hario V60 coffee dripper and filter paper
Mug or jug to hold brewed coffee.
Set of scales

1. Fold filter paper at the seam to fit inside V60 dripper.
2. Rinse the filter with boiling water to preheat the V60 and remove any paper taste, discard water once rinsed.
3. Add fresh filter grind coffee.
4. Place V60 and vessel on top of scales and zero scales.
5. Pour in approximately 50ml of water, enough to saturate all the ground coffee.
6. Leave for 30-45 seconds to finish bubbling, This is known as the bloom.
7. Slowly pour 100ml of boiling hot water over the grinds in a spiral pattern.
8. Pour the remaining 100ml of boiling hot water now to complete the brewing.
9. Once dripping is complete discard the paper filter and serve your V60 Brewed Coffee.

Chemex

chemexThe Chemex was first introduced to market in 1942 by the Chemex Corporation. It was invented by American chemist Peter Schlumbohm (second best name ever!)


What you'll need:

50 grams of coarse ground coffee (should feel like granulated sugar)

900ml of boiling water

Chemex 6 cup brewer and 6 cup filter paper

Set of scales

1. Fold filter paper at the seams to fit inside Chemex.
2. Rinse filter with boiling water, this removes any paper taste and also preheats the Chemex, discard water once rinsed.
3. Add fresh filter grind coffee.
4. Place Chemex on top of scales and zero scales. 
5. Pour in approximately 150mls of water, enough to saturate all the ground coffee. 
6. Leave for 45-60 seconds to finish bubbling, This is known as the Bloom.
7. Slowly pour 250 of boiling hot water over the grinds in a spiral pattern

8. Once you just see the coffee grinds at the bottom pour another 200 ml again slowly and spiralling out and in from the centre to the edge
9. Repeat step 8.

10. Once dripping is complete discard the paper filter and serve your chemex Brewed Coffee.

 

Both these recipes are guidelines and what we enjoy, playing with the variables will produce new and  different flavours. If you prefer to add milk to your coffee increase the amount of coffee by 5%.

 

Happy Brewing!

From your Coffee Culture Roasting Team.

Sam & Hamish.